The answer is, no, they're not. And there's tons of research to back it up. 

The answer is, no, they're not. And there's tons of research to back it up. 

One of our core beliefs is that investors should always pay attention to the expenses of their investments. Every dollar needlessly spent chasing returns is a dollar that should be in your pocket not someone else's.

Reducing the money that you have at work by paying costs that don't directly result in bottom line benefits to you will hurt your chances of meeting your long-term goals.

A strategic decision for every investor is the passive v. active decision and this is where one decision can save a lot of money over time. And, because we're talking about expenses, the savings are a sure thing.

In theory, investors pay for active management because a manager will use their skill in security selection to outperform and index such as the S&P 500. Well, the cost of trading, research and such all raise your bottom line costs, perhaps to an unconscionable level.  

Does this additional cost result in additional returns? No, according to CNBC.com in this recent article "Market Pros Had a Bad Year, So Why Not Buy and Index Fund?"

Are you paying too much for your current investment program? Want to find out for certain if you are or not? Use our Connet With Us form to let us know, we'll contact you to arrange a mutually convenient time to meet. Our evaluation is done on a no-cost, no-obligation basis.