As you know by now, there are a few blogs from others that I read regularly. Zenhabits, Seth Godin and Leaderhip Freak to name a few.  Many of these inspire me and inspire my own blogging efforts.

In Leadership Freak this week, Dan Rockwell was writing about how to overcome the pipe dream problem when I found two of his post comments intriguing and particularly adroit.

  • "Your dreams are doomed if the horses in the barn can't pull the wagon." (love that one actually)
  • "Can you name an aspect of your business that strategy or talent won't address?"

I think that there are two important lessons here and yes, to a great extent they apply to planning your finances, but they don't pertain to that alone. They apply to your life, your business, your relationships as well.

If the horses can't pull the wagon you're in trouble. If your income and your assets can't pay your freight in retirement or for funding a goal you're doomed as well. What most people know is [a] they have horses of some ilk and [b] they have a wagon. That's about it. They pretty much figure that they'll figure out the whole "can they pull it" thing when it comes just about to the point where pulling it is the only thing left to do. If that's the case and the trusty steeds can't cut it, you're pretty much up a well known creek without an appropriate mode of transportation.

Can you name the aspect of your financial life that either talent or strategy won't address? Gosh I hope not.

This whole personal financial thing is no where near as hard as it seems. As Nike said, "Just Do It."

Yeah, it takes time and effort but if you can work 40, 50 or more hours a week earning the money, can't you spend 10 hours a year optimizing it and putting it to work in the right ways? You can outsource the talent search and collaborate on strategy. 

As Seth Godin said in his blog on October 17th, we're adept at creating our own emergencies because as Seth noted.."emergencies concentrate the mind and allow things to get done." But operating from emergency mode is seldom either well thought out or optimal. 

Back against the wall planning isn't an advantage.