I always have lots to read. And, thankfully between some web apps like Pocket and Evernote, I pretty much can scan the various online magainze articles I get (about 100 a week) and "clip and post" stuff to the web for reading on my iPad or my iPhone. 

Ignore the noise and choose your own path. Stick with your long-term plan.

Ignore the noise and choose your own path. Stick with your long-term plan.

I tend not to get too deep into these articles, a quick scan, find a few keywords and "see" a theme for what the article is about all the initial effort I put in. If it feels right, clipped or pocketed, it's saved.

I tend not to get too deep into these articles, a quick scan, find a few keywords and "see" a theme for what the article is about all the initial effort I put in. If it feels right, clipped or pocketed, it's saved. 

Well I happend to come across the article titled "Hefty Redemptions In Mutual Funds"  that appeard in Financial Planning Magazine last week, and it was only that I had been using another article in a conversation with a client that this particular article or portion of it, jumped out at me: 

"Once again, U.S. equity funds took the brunt of the most recent drubbing, losing an estimated $3.08 billion in outflows, a sharp reversal from the previous week’s $906 million inflow. The outflow was less than half the huge $7.2 billion outflow the week ended May 23...."

Really? We're still at it huh? Still believing in tooth fairies and elves it seems. Do we really think that all this fernetic activity is how we're going to get ahead? Boy, Wall Street has got you sold on trading. 

Here's the immutable reality out there for all the folks that believe it's "TIMING THE MARKET" that makes money when every piece of research within reason will tell you it's "TIME IN THE MARKET" that wins the day; you're not going anywhere by getting in and getting out. Oh I know, you'll look at the week you weren't in and say that you avoided the 8% drop, but won't count the 12% you lost the following week when you hadn't gotten back in on time as a loss. That's not math, that's convenience. By the way, I prefer to think of my Hyundai Sonata as a Porsche 911 Turbo. (It's not by the way, no matter how much I think it is. And, avoiding and 8% drop followed by missing a 12% gain is a 12% loss.)

When will we learn that strategy most times involve doing absolutely nothing except sticking to a plan?

I can hear Wall Street's cash register ringing even as I write this....trading doesn't make anybody money except the traders.