Is by "design" or by "default?"

As I was reading Simon Sinek's recent offering, "Start With Why," a story he told early on in the book resonated with me, not only from the standpoint of entrepreneur/business owner but also from the perspective of wealth manager/advisor. 

It seems that a ways back,  some U.S. car manufacturers had visited a Japanese auto manufacturer and were watching the various tasks that were performed along the Japanese assembly line.  While much of the work was the same as "back home,"  the one thing the U.S.  delegation noticed that was missing,  was that in the U.S. there was a last person at the very end of the line who was tasked with whacking each car door with a rubber mallet to get the door to sit properly and line up with the overall body contour. 

When questioned about why step didn't exist in Japan,  the American's Japanese counterpart noted that "we design the doors to fit from the beginning, that's the difference." 

Many people treat their efforts at achieving financial success and as a result the life that they truly desire, in the same way as the American auto assembly line; they treat each and every financial transaction, be it, picking a money market account or deciding on an investment allocation for their 401k plan, about like a U.S. car door; whack it till it ultimately fits, even if it doesn't.

The "piecemeal"  approach is seldom ever going to be efficient and like the U.S. auto builders who had to pay a union worker to swing the mallet and purchase lots of rubber mallets for them to swing, generally, in the long run to be sure, it's going to be more much more expensive. 

Because we fail to choose a path to take, cobbling together financial assets and financial decisions seems the norm.  Without a well thought out plan, we have little context to balance our decisions against. Absent a well defined standard, almost everything is going to fit more-or-less, even if we have to hit it with a mallet to make it so. But the reality remains that it didn't really fit at all did it?

To be sure, it's one more thing checked off the list. But that doesn't make it either effective or right, does it?

The fact is, that on its surface, you'd have a hard time telling the folks with a well thought out plan and path from the ones without one. But, over time, as calamity and change have their influence, it wouldn't be hard to tell at all.  If you never had a plan, it'd be awful hard to stick to it. 

Set a course for your financial future and stick to it. Decide what you'll need to live the life you truly believe that you're entitled to based on a lifetime of work, then figure out how to get there.  There are steps, pragmatic and calculable ones, that put you on the right course. 

Find them.